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Vaccination Schedule
Andrews Veterinary has established a vaccination protocol to properly protect your senior dog from preventable diseases. Senior dogs should have health check-ups twice a year. As some dogs age they may be medicated for certain aliments, just like humans. It is recommended blood test should be preformed to make sure the body is responding properly to their prescribed medications. In addition, vaccinations, fecal and heartworm tests, and dental check-ups should also be preformed during this exam.

Senior Dog Vaccination # 9 (9 Years of Age)
  • Bordetella Booster
  • Adult dogs more than 10 lbs. & are considered to be an indoor/outdoor dog, should be vaccinated for Leptospira.
  • We recommend dogs that are active outdoors should be vaccinated for Lyme Disease.
Senior Dog Vaccination # 10 (10 Years of Age)
  • Rabies 3 year. We recommend a Rabies 3 year vaccination unless this is the first year your dog has been vaccinated. This vaccination will be valid for 3 years.
  • Adult dogs more than 10 lbs. & are considered to be an indoor/outdoor dog, should be vaccinated for Leptospira.
  • We recommend dogs that are active outdoors should be vaccinated for Lyme Disease.
Senior Dog Vaccination # 11 (11 Years of Age)
  • 3 year Distemper, Adenovirus Type 2, Parainfluenza, & Parvo combo shot. This vaccination will be valid for 3 years unless this is the 1 st year your dog has been vaccinated.
  • Adult dogs more than 10 lbs. & are considered to be an indoor/outdoor dog, should be vaccinated for Leptospira.
  • We recommend dogs that are active outdoors should be vaccinated for Lyme Disease.
Senior Dog Vaccination # 12-14 (12-14 Years of Age).
The vaccination protocol will repeat starting from Senior Dog Vaccination # 9.


Deworming Schedule
We recommend your dog should be tested for parasites yearly and or dewormed every 6 months. You may see no signs of a parasite infestation.


Nail Trimming
To keep your dogs paws healthy continue to trim their nails. Trimming their nails on a regular basis makes the procedure less stressful and it becomes a routine rather than a bad experience or a fearful situation. Letting their nails grow too long makes walking uncomfortable and the quicks of the nail too long. This is especially the case for senior dogs. As your dog gets older they become less active and the natural wearing of their nails may not happen. You may need to trim them more frequently than when your dog was younger. If the quicks become too long the likelihood of drawing blood when trimming is greater. Once the quicks get too long, the nails can only be trimmed back so far without hurting your dog.


Ear Cleaning
It is a good idea to clean your dogs ears at least once a month. One of the most common office visits for dogs is ear problems. Using an approved veterinary ear cleaner will help keep their ears from getting infections and wax build up.


Teeth
As your dog becomes older, keeping on eye on their teeth is important. Look at their gums and see if they appear red or sore. Also look at the amount of tartar and decay on their teeth especially the molars. If your dog has poor teeth their eating habits may change and other health problems can develop. We recommend you have your dog's teeth checked and if needed, be cleaned.


Massage
To keep your dogs joints loose and comfortable it is a good idea to rub and massage your dogs limbs. Just like in humans, older dogs get aches and pains in their joints. A good routine would be to do this after exercise or before bed when you and your dog are relaxed. Your dog would greatly appreciate it.


Exercise
It is important to provide exercise for your senior dog. Your dog may not have the stamina it did when he or she was a pup, however they still need exercise. Weight becomes an issue as your dog ages. Exercise will help your dog maintain a good weight. You can still do the same activities with your dog just in shorter durations.